Interdependence, ethics and social networks -…

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PRESENTERS

His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama

Day 1
Welcome: Susan Bauer-Wu, President, Mind & Life Institute
Moderator: Roshi Joan Halifax, Upaya Institute and Zen Center
Speaker: Richard Davidson, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Speaker: John Dunne, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Performer: Thupten Jinpa, Compassion Institute and Chairman of the Board, Mind & Life Institute
Presenter: Joseph Henrich, Harvard University
Presenter: Molly Crockett, Princeton University

Day 2
Welcome: Amy Cohen Varela, Chair of the Board, Mind & Life Europe
Moderator: Martijn van Beek, University of Aarhus
Speaker: John Dunne, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Performer: Thupten Jinpa, Compassion Institute and Chairman of the Board, Mind & Life Institute
Presenter: Hanne De Jaegher, University of the Basque Country
Presenter: Abeba Birhane, University College Dublin

SESSIONS TOPICS

Day 1
Joseph Henrich explores the question: What makes us human? A growing body of research shows that more than any other animal, humans depend on learning from others. Joe shares insights into how culture is passed down through multiple generations and defines how we thrive and survive as a species. This cultural evolution gave birth to the Collective Spirit. Joseph shares his research by addressing three key aspects of human nature: norm, interdependence, and ethnic psychology.

Molly Crockett explores the stories we tell ourselves as humans and how research proves that our human compassion is vast and vast. Does collective history promote shared identity and universal compassion for all? Or does it divide humanity into a purified “us” and a reviled “them”? As we face the challenges of today’s world, we can look to history, tradition, and storytelling to better understand humanity, contemplative wisdom, and modern cognitive science.

Day 2
Hanne De Jaegher, a philosopher who works in the enactive tradition of Francisco Varela, explains how human cognition is based, at the most fundamental level, on love and is eminently social in nature. Focusing on intersubjectivity, or the space in between, in human interactions, she explores the tension of how we are both the same, as His Holiness aptly reminds us, yet vastly different. . She argues that this difference – which contains the ambiguity and complexity of human experience – can in fact be generative, provided we take an ethical approach to human relationship.

Abeba Birhane, a specialist in the ethics of artificial intelligence, shares with us some of her latest research on the ethical and social considerations that underpin artificial intelligence (AI) as it is used around the world. Because human experience is inherently complex, ambiguous, and indeterminate, AI very often fails to accurately capture and predict human behavior. Moreover, because of its attempts at generalization, we learn that AI negatively affects marginalized people and communities disproportionately. His talk illustrates this with a myriad of recent examples and challenges us to develop a healthy skepticism towards the widespread use of AI, all in the hope of creating a fairer basis for its use. future.

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